\ I couldn't leave my best girl
I couldn't leave my best girl

Daphne, 17, the Netherlands

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

Notes

housingworksbookstore:

blackballoonpublishing:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

vintageanchorbooks:

HOW LONG IT TAKES TO READ THE WORLD’S MOST POPULAR BOOKS: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/how-long-it-takes-to-read-the-worlds-most-popular-books

My brain likes this like this.

This is almost too good.

I gotta go, I have some reading to do.

Notes
Notes

kiss me and i’ll cut your fucking tongue out.

Notes
Notes
cactit:

rdikuls:

Eloy Morales-the world’s best photorealistic painter

Scrolling from the top I thought the painting was an actual man damn

cactit:

rdikuls:

Eloy Morales-the world’s best photorealistic painter

Scrolling from the top I thought the painting was an actual man damn

Notes
jensenjackles:

this is as finished as its going to get

jensenjackles:

this is as finished as its going to get

Notes
Notes

funny-shit-for-giggles:

youngblackandvegan:

yourpersonalcheerleader:

linrenzo:

videohall:

Baby laughing while getting shots

> Rock star doctor.

I don’t care how old he will be I’m taking my future children to him

My heart!

this is just the cutest thing ever!!!

Are you kidding? If my doctor treated me like this, I’d totally be fine with shots. Instead they’re just as awkward about giving the shots as people are about getting them.

Notes

thepurposeofplaying:

balinkim:

My brother is a senior in high school and his weirdo English teacher gave the class these terms lol

ok no i think this might just be the most important post i have ever seen

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scurviesdisneyblog:

Marc Davis appreciation post

Notes

scenicroutes:

"nah we can’t have female leads or characters of colour or gay characters or else our show will bomb"

image

image

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junigirl14:

toastor:

fallaces sunt rerum species means appearances are deceptive and Natasha Romanoff is the best fucking avenger fight me

This

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emilymayhem:

nova-arcania:

gokuma:

stunningpicture:

Dressed up like Slender Man to scare kids tonight, met a mini me.


#it looks like slenderman taking his kid out for take your kid to work day


That is adorable

That’s freaking cute

emilymayhem:

nova-arcania:

gokuma:

stunningpicture:

Dressed up like Slender Man to scare kids tonight, met a mini me.

That is adorable

That’s freaking cute

Notes

khaleesi:

cleolinda:

shialablunt:

fun fact: Michael Cera asked Rihanna if he could slap her ass for real and she said “you can slap my ass for real if I can slap you in the face for real” and he was like alright. and they did the take like 3 times and Michael was like “you’re not hitting me hard enough do it for real” and then she slapped the fuck out of him and threw off his equilibrium so much he had to go lay down in his trailer for like half an hour lmao and that’s the take they used in the movie with no added sound effects 

his head disappears omg

bless this post

Notes
S